Tickets for this event are not available through the UCA Box Office.

EVERY GOOD BOY DESERVES FAVOR by Tom Stoppard

Theatre Events
Griffin Concert Hall, UCA
Thursday, Sep 21, 2017 at 7:30 PM (MT)
A Piece for Actors and Orchestra
Music by André Previn
Directed by Eric Prince and Conducted by Wes Kenney
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE ONLINE OR THROUGH THE BOX OFFICE: This work is being performed in conjunction with the University Symphony Orchestra concert on September 21 and 22, 2017. Tickets for this event are sold under the Music Category: University Symphony Orchestra Concert
On Thursday, Sept. 21 at 6:30 p.m., Eric Prince, director, and Wes Kenney, conductor, will give a pre-show discussion as part of a College of Liberal Arts-wide initiative to expand awareness of issues of diversity, inclusion, and free speech. We hope you'll join us!


Every Good Boy Deserves Favor, the brilliant effort between composer Andre Previn and the fecund playwright Tom Stoppard, celebrates the collaborative capabilities of the School of Music, Theatre, and Dance. Not often produced due to the challenge of staging a play requiring a full orchestra, the story concerns dissident Alexander Ivanov; imprisoned in a Soviet mental hospital, he will not be released until admitting that his statements against the government were caused by a (non-existent) mental disorder. In the hospital, he shares a cell with a genuinely disturbed schizophrenic, also called Ivanov, who believes to have an orchestra under his command. The play satirizes the Soviet practice of treating political dissidence as mental illness, and its title will be recognized as the classic mnemonic used by music students to remember the notes on the lines of the treble clef.

The play’s 1977 premiere at London’s Royal Festival Hall was a part of Queen Elizabeth's Silver Jubilee. In 2005, CSU staged the production as part of Griffin Concert Hall’s opening program to coincide with the visit of former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet Union’s final leader, famous for his reformations of glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring).

This production promises to be a quite remarkable artistic event, integrating the power of a symphonic orchestra with the artistry of actors, marrying Andre Previn's superbly orchestrated music with Tom Stoppard's brilliant dramatic satire on the absurdity of the Soviet era system. Possibly even more relevant than ever in the new United States of alternative facts and the political inversions of truth and deception. —Eric Prince